Spiced Ginger Chicken

Spiced Ginger Chicken Recipe - Ginger spiced chicken breast with a slightly sticky coating | WorthCooking.net

This is my favorite cooking method for chicken breast. I was a little afraid to make that claim, but it really is! Sometimes I want other dishes that need chicken breast, but if I simply want to make a chicken breast that shines– it is this more often than not.

First, the chicken is well seasoned. I usually am all about fresh- but powdered garlic and onion work far better in this application. The fresh ones would be too wet and bulky. Flavoring beyond garlic and onion depends on what flavor profile I am going with. This particular version is Asian themed so I also did dried ginger and Chinese five spice powder. I love that combo of flavors because it has a unique blend of sweet and savory.

Spiced Ginger Chicken Recipe - Ginger spiced chicken breast with a slightly sticky coating | WorthCooking.net

The seasoned chicken is then dredged in arrowroot powder or tapioca starch. That is the most important step as the starch is how the magic happens. But a bit more on that in a second.

A quick sear in a hot pan lets the starch do it’s thing- brown beautifully. It makes a beautiful crispy crust on the chicken. Admire the crust for a bit, because it is about to become soggy. But not in a soggy crust sort of way. A luscious sticky coating that let’s all the flavor of a yummy sauce – in this case chicken stock and coconut aminos- cling to the chicken.

In the end you have a slightly sticky coating (like in my sticky shrimp) and a delectable sauce.

Spiced Ginger Chicken Recipe - Ginger spiced chicken breast with a slightly sticky coating | WorthCooking.net

4.3 from 3 reviews
Spiced Ginger Chicken
Author: 
Serves: 3-6
 
Ginger spiced chicken breast with a slightly sticky coating.
Ingredients
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 3 chicken breasts, sliced in half lengthwise (so you have two thin fillets from each breast)
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ginger powder
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon chinese five spice powder
  • ¼ cup+ arrowroot powder or tapioca starch
  • 3 tablespoons coconut aminos
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 cup chicken stock (the more gelatinous the better)
Instructions
  1. Heat the coconut oil in a 16 inch skillet over medium heat.
  2. Mix together the seasonings, sprinkle on the chicken.
  3. Put ¼ cup arrowroot or tapioca starch on a plate, spread it out. Dredge the chicken in the arrowroot, adding more to the plate if necessary. Shake off excess starch.
  4. Sear the chicken well on each side, working in two batches. It takes 2-3 minutes per side.
  5. Remove from the pan and set aside.
  6. Add the chicken stock, coconut aminos, and rice vinegar to the skillet. Turn to high heat and start to boil it. Boil for 3-4 minutes until the bubbles start to appear more hefty, it should reduce by about half.
  7. Reduce the heat to low. Once the sauce has stopped boiling and is either standing still or just barely bubbling on the sides, add the chicken. Cover and cook for about 5 minutes, flip the chicken and cook for a 3-5 minutes more until it is cooked through. Remove the chicken, if the sauce is not thick enough bring it to a boil and boil for a few seconds to a minute. The sauce should just be thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, than have a trail left in it when you run your finger down the back of the spoon.
  8. Serve the chicken with the sauce spooned over it.

Linked To:
Allergy Free Wednesday @ Tessa Domestic Diva
Gluten Free Wednesday @ The Gluten Free Homemaker
Homemade Mondays @ Frugal By Choice
Inspiration Monday @ I Should Be Mopping The Floor
Recipe Sharing Monday @ Jam Hands
Melt In Your Mouth Monday @ Make Ahead Meals
Mix It Up Monday @ Flour Me With Love
Mouth Watering Mondays @ A Souther Fairytale
Fat Tuesday @ Real Food Forager

 

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Comments

  1. says

    I love that you used coconut aminos! I always try to use them instead of soy sauce. This recipe looks really tasty and like a great way to make chicken a little more exciting. Visiting from SNF!

    • says

      I thought so, but once I had soy again (just recently tried some for the first time in about a year) I could definitely tell the difference. That being said, I think it is delicious and definitely gives a fermented/umami flavor. Definitely the best soy sub I have found.

  2. Justyn says

    Good grief, Brad! The lady that runs this site is a sweetheart and she is doing this to help people. Your nasty assessment was completely uncalled for. Her response was not “oh just make your own” it was, “I make my own usually as I can’t really find it corn free.” She was just telling us her solution. She is not required to hunt down the perfect brand for every reader out there.

    Beyond that, making your own stock is much cheaper than buying it ready made and it’s very easy. Save chicken bones and veggie scraps. Throw them in a large pot or a crock pot. Cover them with water and simmer on low for 12 to 48 hours. Strain. It’s much healthier, cheaper and tastier than spending a fortune on the ready-made stuff at the store.

    Now, please consider your words before you type. Pretend you are typing to the person whom you most respect and love. If all else fail, keep your thoughts to yourself and spare generous and kind people like this blogger from the nastiness that is stemming from whatever your issues are.

  3. Sara says

    I am sure a specialty or health food store probably has a gf version – probably pricy! I know before I started making my own stick it was a bit overwhelming. But it is SO simple. And when you have allergies it is sometimes easier and most always less expensive to make it.
    An you don’t have to have raw chicken. Just save the bones next time you make chicken. Throw them in a pot cover in water and simmer for a few hours to a few days (could even use a crockpot). Then add whatever veggies you want (onion, celery, carrot) half hour before you are ready to strain it.
    I toss our bones and about to go off veggies in the freezer until I have time to do the stock.
    And once you start making it you can use it for all sorts of stuff to give a deeper flavor.

  4. Sara says

    I think it is implied to just go look for it. As you said, buy it at the store. She didn’t say make your own – she said she didn’t know cause she makes her own.
    Please remember there are real people that write these blogs/recipes. Your comment is very rude.

  5. Brad says

    Same thing for the Chinese spice…. can be found in health food stores, some Kroger stores & Asian grocery stores that can be found in all 50 states…… sorry the owner of this website isn’t more helpful to her followers!!…. telling people “oh just make your own” doesn’t really help…. not everybody has extra raw chicken lying around or chicken bones to make their own broth.

  6. Brad says

    You can get gluten free chicken stock at health food stores, such as Whole Foods. you can also get it at some Kroger stores, like Smith’s

  7. Penny Cuccio says

    I don’t have the 5 chinese spice what can I use instead? Thank you. Always appreciate the help from everyone.

  8. Rachel Hunziker says

    I have had the hardest time finding a Chicken Broth / Stock that are Gluten Free? Do you have a particular brand that you use that is labeled Gluten Free? This recipe sounds amazing but that’s the only thing that is holding me back from making it.

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